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Borsch

Borsch is a very traditional Russian beets-based stew. It is typically very heavy, savory, and perfect for cold winter nights. I think traditionally it came to be as a way to combine whatever vegetables were available with scraps of meat and fattiness into a hot stew. But I obviously had the option to use more … Continue reading

Food Comas Turns 1!

May 13th marks a special day for us here… Food Comas turns 1 year old today!  Exactly one year ago, I wrote my first ever blog post on Baby Lamb Chops with Cucumber-Mint Relish.  I didn’t really know what I was doing (regarding both cooking and blogging) but I went for it anyway.  At first, … Continue reading

Vinigret Salad

This salad is a very popular Russian dish that features the often stereotyped Russian staples of potatoes and beets. It shares many of its ingredients with Olivye, and so the two are frequently served simultaneously at large dinners during the salad/appetizer course. It is often referred to as “Vinaigrette Salad” on American websites, which makes … Continue reading

Beet Top Stew

When cooking beets, oftentimes people will just discard the beet tops.  It is such as waste because the stems and leaves can be eaten as well.  A great way to use leftover beet tops is to make an easy and  delicious beet top stew! This beet top stew recipe was given to me by my … Continue reading

Roasted Beets with a Curry Vinaigrette

` I absolutely love beets — it is such a refreshingly sweet vegetable.  I love to eat them with salads or in borscht like Holodnik (Russian cold soup).   Typically, you can cook the beets by simply boiling them in water until tender.  My chef friend Kei, who works at a very fancy Michelin-starred restaurant … Continue reading

Holodnik (Russian cold soup)

My roommate is originally from Belarus, and through her I have been able to enjoy some unique dishes from her motherland.  While I like to tease that all they consume there is vodka and potatoes, Russian cuisine can be quite varied.  One of my favorites is Holodnik (literally “cold soup” in Russian), which Natalya makes … Continue reading