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Peruvian Cooking Class – Dinner

After landing in Lima on my Peru travels, one of the first orders of business was scheduling a Peruvian cooking class. Natalya had taken a class with Sky Kitchen when she was in Lima several years ago and she highly recommended it. She took the class with the lunch dishes, which she wrote about here: … Continue reading

Picarones

Picarones is Peruvian dessert that is commonly sold on the streets of Peru.  The squash and sweet potato are puréed and mixed into a dough, which is then deep fried into doughnuts, and served with a syrup made from molasses.  The flavor is so unique due to the squash and sweet poato, and its sweetness … Continue reading

Lomo Saltado

When I first arrived in Peru, I was surprised to see all the Chinese eateries all over Lima.  I had not realized how large the Chinese immigrant population in Peru was, or rather, how much influence Chinese culture had on Peruvian cuisine.  Asian Peruvians make up about 5% of the current population, although it is … Continue reading

Ceviche

Ceviche is an extremely popular coastal seafood dish in Central and South America.  It is made with raw  fish that is “cooked” in citrus juices (lime or lemon) and spiced with aji (chili peppers).   It is often mixed with onions and served with complementing sides, such as sweet potato, lettuce, corn, avocado or plantain. The origins … Continue reading

Causa

Causa is a unique Peruvian dish made of potatoes (shocker, I know) that are mashed and seasoned with key lime, onion, chili, and oil.  The mashed potatoes are then layered with a variety of stuffings, such as avocado, chicken, canned tuna, or shellfish.  This potato salad “cake” is usually served cold.  Causa is very popular … Continue reading

Peruvian Cooking Class – Lunch

The main thing I wanted to do when planning a few days around Lima was to take a Peruvian cooking class. I was initially intrigued by Peruvian cuisine after visiting a few restaurants in New York: Lima’s Taste (weirdly on Cinco de Mayo years ago because it was “close enough to Mexican” when all Mexican … Continue reading